We did not win the Cold War

After the collapse of the Soviet Union the thugs (KGB) that were already running the place realized that communism did not provide them with enough goods & services to steal from the ‘New Soviet Man’ so they created a new form of government: The Cupiditocracy.

Our Ruling Class have discovered the brilliance in this ancient economic system and with full support of the rank & file Progressives, globalists, communists, Marxists, socialists, fascists, etc., are leading us by deceit and design down the same path to the same destination as have Pol Pot, Lenin, and Stalin.

It is still tyranny – fed by greed and resentment but they have found Soviet style Marxism wanting and have made rudder adjustments.

32 thoughts on “We did not win the Cold War

  1. The iron curtain was a real problem; if you are looking to steal other people’s money and trample their rights, globalism works much better. Globalism won’t work forever, but it has the potential to last a lot longer than the U.S.S.R did. Plus, with globalism, people are never quite sure who is in charge, or who is to blame. It’s a win/win/win from a leftist perspective.

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  2. Buenos! Cheery topic for a Monday here. Kleptocracy and inculcated cluelessness are a dispiriting but effective combination…Those who did succeed when the wall came down would’ve found a way in any case. Hong Kong thoughts? I’m awed by their initiative and tenacity.

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  3. Query, and musical interlude:: “Cupiditocracy” sounds like something that has the possibility to be a positive. How does this play out?…For instance,

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  4. Howdy, ST: Just to show you that I’m still actually thinking about this…(The above was sort of a “laugh-to-keep-from-crying” diversionary tactic.) We not only can’t win and keep the peace as free, self-determining, thinking men and women; we seem to be blithely engaged in shredding what little peace there is into infinitesimally-tiny pieces. I’m ready with my crochet hook, AKA, “The Simon Tao” with a dash of the “Golden Rule”.

    I can’t help but think there’s a lot of hidden pain in the younger, actually-naive, first-world ‘proponents’ of this ‘globo-prog’ stuff: If we got ‘mugged’ by conservatism – the scorched earth reality of this “utopia” is gonna hit them like a ton of bricks…Yeah, I know: “What about the malevolent agony they want to inflict?” It almost seems like they’re lashing out, so they don’t have to confront what’s going on within them…I definitely don’t condone any of it; just trying to find an entry-point to start neutralizing it. I channel C. G. Jung when I’m tired…Long day at the office.

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    1. Thank you for sharing that post Nanda: there is a great deal of truth there, but I am going to kind of play Devil’s Advocate. Kind of. There is no question that young Americans have experienced more material comfort than anyone in the history of the world ever has. They also live with crushing debt or at least the prospect of crushing debt.

      Example: one of my aunts was born in the late 1920’s. She told me the story once of a guy she knew when she was younger. This guy graduated from high school and got some kind of normal job, doing I can’t remember what, but he wasn’t making tons of money: he just had a normal, run of the mill job. This was in the old days, when unmarried young people generally lived with their parents before marriage, and while many of the them probably helped their parents out financially in some way, most of them weren’t really required to pay rent to their parents. But this guy’s mother demanded that he pay rent, and not just that, but she charged him a lot for rent. Again, this was the old days, so the guy didn’t get mad and move out: he probably wondered a little about his mother, but he kept his mouth shout and forked over the money. This went on for at several years-I can’t remember how long, probably 5 or 6 years? A significant amount of time, but not an eternity. At some point, this guy met a girl, fell in love, and they got engaged. During their engagement, they went house shopping. There were some brand new homes being built in their town, and one day, the guy’s mother brought them to see one of these homes. She asked her future daughter in law how she liked this brand new home she was standing in: the daughter in law of course loved the house, but stated that they could never afford to buy it. You probably know by now how this story ends: the mother had been putting every penny her son gave her in rent in a bank account, and when he got married, there was enough money in that account to pay for one of those brand new houses in full: that young couple, back in the late 1940’s or early 1950’s started out in their marriage with no student loan debt, no mortgage, no debt of any kind, and they totally (really) owned their own home. That isn’t possible today, unless the kids are being very heavily subsidized by their parents.

      Young people today associate capitalism with crushing debt that never ends. Even the ones who can escape student loan debt are living in a society where it is taken for granted that it will take at least 30 years to pay a house off. It didn’t used to be this way. The banks want to convince us that living our whole lives with huge amounts of debt is totally normal, but it isn’t, and debt is a huge factor in why so many young people embrace socialism.

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  5. It’s about choices…Crushing debt that they either talked themselves into – or let guidance counselors convince them that a four-year-plus was a must-have. Not-to-mention parents (Felicity Huffman, anyone?) who wanted a marquee degree for their own reputations. And, let’s not forget Uncle Sugar forcing private – often small town, lower interest rate lenders – out of the student loan market. (At least 2 of my nephews were hit with this one.) Sorry, JaC, this time, I don’t buy it. I still like you, but, agree-to-disagree. (smile)

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    1. I understand, but an 18 year kid who signs up for tons of student loan debt because every adult in his life is telling him to do so is acting the way most 18 year old kids have always and will always act: no matter how much they may pretend to rebel, kids usually, generally do what their elders tell them to do. In many cases, the parents involved will come down like a ton of bricks if the kids don’t sign up for debt, but those same parents will give their kids a pass if they decide to support socialism. I don’t blame the kids, I blame older people who gave their kids bad advice. I blame older people who are sending young people the message that supporting socialism is fine, but going to trade school instead of college is a mistake from which no one ever recovers.

      Teenagers who possess both the intelligence and the emotional strength to defy both the elders in their lives and their peers are exceedingly rare, probably non existent. Young people are just doing what they were told to do-young people in general have always done what they are told to do. That hasn’t changed. What they are being told to do has changed, and that isn’t their fault. It probably isn’t anyone’s fault: parents and older people are not perfect, and the vast majority want what is best for their kids, but we need to face the fact that in many or most cases, what young people are being advised to do is not in their best interests.

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      1. “Probably non-existent” – not quite…What about the 1% who sign up to defend us from ourselves and our bad choices as a nation? 70 to 80 percent of them are 18-21…I’m not about to give their “we’ve never experienced prosperity”. learned-helplessness, adopted-obliviousness peers a pass. Helicopter and Lawnmower parents haven’t helped. That’s for sure….

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  6. Mine, above, also applies to home-ownership: not a civil or ‘human’ right, either. Amb. Mary Anne Glendon has been appointed to chair the State Dept.’s Task Force/Commission on “unalienable rights”. She was interviewed last week, and lamented the proliferation of things defined/considered in terms of “rights” which are more properly described as opportunities. Equality of opportunity, rather than outcome…Some of this confusion seems to have made its way into conservative thought, too. (By the way, did you know that “unalienable” is actually a typesetting/printing error? Jefferson actually wrote “inalienable”.)

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    1. Nanda, I have never and would never suggest that home ownership is a right, but for most people it is a good financial choice, if it is possible. And in a free and prosperous society, it should be possible for most people and something is wrong if it isn’t. Not saying something is wrong with the government or with capitalism, just that something is wrong.

      I believe in capitalism because of all the financial systems, capitalism provides the most opportunity and best life for the most people. Our current problems are not being caused by capitalism, but many of the people who helped to create these problems are blaming capitalism. We should recognize the very real problems that exist in our society, and name the real causes of those problems. Trying to argue that the problems aren’t really problems or that teenagers need to start recognizing when everyone is giving them bad advice isn’t going to work.

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    1. It will be interesting to see what Amb.-Prof. Glendon’s Commission ends up with in their findings…Night prayers and sleep are claiming my attention, JaC, so: Buenas, Entonces, and Chao for now…

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  7. I know and am related to several young people who are or have been in the military: their family and friends supported their decision to serve 1000%. The young people I know who serve in the military are truly the greatest people; are they defying everyone they have ever known when they enlist? The ones I know aren’t. The young military guys I know have the full support of their parents, their families, and their friends.

    I stand by what I said: an 18 year old who has both the intelligence and the emotional strength to defy both his elders and all of his peers is exceedingly rare, probably non existent. Actually, any human being of any age who can do that is exceedingly rare, but it is even less likely to happen with a young person.

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  8. They may be rare as hen’s teeth, but not non-existent, thank goodness. Those of us who may be chid-bearers in our hearts have a duty to those in our ambit, to call forth their minds and spines, when we hear ineffectuality or hopelessness in their communication with us, don’t we?

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  9. Critical thinking skills have been ignored for a generation or two, and we end up here …Yikes! My normally even-tempered Mother got hot whenever Dr. Benjamin Spock was mentioned. She pegged his parenting advice as a force in the trend against the traditional family – and expectations-based child-rearing

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  10. It seems we’re in the mist of a Lukewarm War here on the home front; and we *can’t buy* the narrative that we’ve already lost. Wring out the towel, but don’t let’s throw it in! Oh, and: Buenos/Buenas!

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  11. Viktor Frankl had a lot to say about the fact that ensuring a certain level of economic security does not guarantee happiness; misery in the midst of prosperity…Meaning is missing…We need to model another way.

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  12. What would “The Simon Tao” intersecting with “The Golden Rule” look like in our atomized, secularized, materialized country/society? One person at a time, all the time; not forgetting the need to be a recipient of such, too. A query for the Kaffeeklatsch…

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  13. Speaking of tyranny. My understanding that HR 8 2019 has been passed by the House and forwarded to the Senate where it will die as it should.

    I also understand that this bill if enacted into law would turn the phrase guilty until proven innocent on its head. Think I’ll draft an OP about this sometime (relatively) soon.

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  14. Yeah, but *with* all y’alls input, to stretch me a bit more, please and thanks? Reading more of Frankl, and Jeremiah Denton, right now…trying to tease out a spiritual strength dimension that stretches enough to share – and yet doesn’t get watered-down…Lt. Zirnheld’s prayer has me thinking a lot this week.

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  15. Thanks for revealing your ideas. A very important factor is that learners have a choice between federal student loan and also a private student loan where its easier to opt for student loan debt consolidation loan than in the federal education loan.

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